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Sorceress Resurrected by Evan Michael Martin

Horror/Dark Fantasy Fiction

A Clio Boru Novel

Available 10/31/2016 in Hardcover, Paperback, and Ebook!

To order, email wdp@writtendreams.com!

Hardcover ISBN 9780998167343:  $24.99            

Paperback ISBN 9780996252188: $16.99               

Ebook ISBN: 9780998167336: $8.99

With their only hope in a coma, John and Roger must save the town from an evil force, but can they stop it without the assistance of Clio’s natural gifts?

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In the small, quiet town of Lake Melts, Wisconsin, three friends suffer a tragedy when Clio Boru is hospitalized and is comatose after a terrible accident.

As Clio lies powerless in a hospital bed, her mind in another realm, Old Native American superstitions arise in Lake Melts. Deputy John Slocum, beside himself with worry over Clio’s condition, has to find a murderer when two boys turn up dead. But, his inner fears surface—John’s depression and being heartbroken, hoping for a miracle for Clio makes it difficult to cope.

That leaves Roger Marquette as Lake Melts’ only hope of finding the truth. While Roger Marquette researches and attempts to fill the void created by Clio’s absence, he is limited by what he can do.

Meanwhile, Ancient Rites, complete with an influential family history of heroes from another time, force Clio to travel to different places far beyond her unconscious imagination.

Clio lingers far away, as Roger tries to figure out exactly what this unseen otherworldly danger is and how to keep it from the town.

But lurking in the dark, a more horrific, sinister evil waits its chance to finally destroy Clio and all she and her friends hold dear. Will Clio be strong enough to resurrect herself before all is lost?hosts, shadow people and gypsy curses fill the maternal side of his family, from Northeast Wisconsin to France, Poland, and Ireland.  His travels have taken him to many sites where he experienced firsthand ghosts and the unexplained. Sorceress Resurrected is the third book in the Clio Boru Series. He currently lives in Northeast Wisconsin.

Author Bio:

EMM02Evan Michael Martin has lived a life on the fringes of the occult and supernatural.  Stories of ghosts, shadow people and gypsy curses fill the maternal side of his family, from Northeast Wisconsin to France, Poland, and Ireland.  His travels have taken him to many sites where he experienced firsthand ghosts and the unexplained. Sorceress Resurrected is the third book in the Clio Boru Series. He currently lives in Northeast Wisconsin. Visit his website at EvanMMartin.com.

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Writer’s Wednesday: An Interview with the Edgar and Stoker Nominated Author, Billie Sue Mosiman

I first discovered Billie Sue and her writing in the mid 90s about a year before she edited the anthology, Never Shake a Family Tree. It is with great pleasure to have her as our guest today. Please help me welcome her to The Editing Essentials!

Billie Sue Mosiman is an Edgar and Stoker Nominated author of  more than 50 e-books. She published 13 novels with New York major publishers and recently published BANISHED, her latest novel. She’s the author of at least 150 published short stories that were in various magazines and anthologies. Her latest stories will be in BETTER WEIRD edited by Paul F. Olson from Cemetery Dance, a tribute anthology to David Silva, a story in the anthology ALLEGORIES OF THE TAROT edited by Annetta Ribken, and another story in William Cook’s FRESH FEAR. She’s an active member of HWA and International Thriller Writers. She’s working on a new novel of suspense titled THE GREY MATTER. You can visit her at: The Peculiar Life of a Writer http://www.peculiarwriter.blogspot.com, or at Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/billie.s.mosiman or on Twitter: @billiemosiman or at Billie Sue’s Amazon Page.

WD: Does your family support your writing career, and if so, have they always?

BM: Yes, my husband has always supported me in my career. Before I sold a novel, all my other women friends had a job and I was at home, writing. I’m sure they thought I was being lazy because didn’t everyone work? My husband continued supporting the family and believing in me until I got my first contract. My daughters were raised with a writer so they understood what I was doing (I probably lectured them enough about how important Mama’s work was!). They tried hard not to interrupt me when I was at the typewriter and the computer.

WD: Does anybody in your family write because of your influence on them?

BM: No. My daughters are creative in various ways, but they haven’t been writing.

WD: What inspired you to begin writing?

BM: I can’t imagine. Since I wanted to be a writer from the time I was thirteen, I can’t say what inspired me. I think it was because I was raised around Southern storytellers who sat around telling one another tales, but it could also be because, or in addition to, my love of reading books.

WD: What author or authors influenced your own style?

 

BM: There were several. John D. MacDonald, Jim Thompson, Phillip K. Dick, Scott Fitzgerald, John Steinbeck, and a whole raft of mystery and suspense popular writers during the 70s and 80s.

WD: What is your own process for getting a manuscript complete? Any habits? How do you stay focused?

BM: I believe in dedication and discipline. I was under contract from year to year so I had novels to turn in and expected of me. I would write every day five days a week and take weekends off to devote to my family. That kind of schedule became a routine. I stay focused by reading over what I’ve written the day before and falling into the page, falling into the story so that I can see it in my head and can write the next scene or chapter.

WD: What are your thoughts on how the industry is radically changing to benefit the author? How do you see the industry changing for the better or worse?

BM: With digital books it’s changed almost completely. Writers in my early years of course sent their paper manuscripts in manuscript boxes to New York publishing houses or agents. Today writers can simply upload them to a digital online bookstore. I think the industry has changed for the better in giving the author more control and it’s changed for the worse in making people believe their work is ready to be “published” digitally when it isn’t, or when as writers they really have some way to go to be professional writers. I expect it will all shake out eventually, but the transition might be rocky.

WD: If you could give one tip to a new writer, what would it be?

BM: Write like it means something to you, like storytelling is your life’s goal and you want to tell the best stories anyone ever told. Try to write in a humane way, with heart, and hope to touch people. Write with nerve, take risks, try to do what hasn’t been done or do what has been done better. Lastly, get an editor. Your prose probably isn’t as polished as you think it is.

 

Thank you, Billie Sue, for being with us today! If you’d like to leave a comment or question for Billie Sue, we will be happy to pass it on to her.