breach reads cover

Summer ’17 Beach Reads: ebook edition

Here in the Midwest, we spend nine months of the year dreaming about the other three months: June, July, and August. We live for the days when we can lounge by a lake with a cool glass of iced tea in one hand and a book in the other.

There’s an art to picking summer books. The key is to find something that will carry you away – either by its gripping plot or its ability to lift you up and drop you into someone else’s life. Here are five Written Dreams’ titles that are beach-approved. Each of these are available in ebook to help keep your beach bag light. Enjoy!

 

Mystery

Land SharksLand Sharks by Katherine Nohr

Set in ever-sunny Hawaii, this legal mystery looks beyond the tourist brochures at Honolulu’s underbelly. Young attorney Zana West must represent a fellow triathlete who claims to have been paralyzed in competition. Sharks gather as Zana has to work with celebrity lawyer Jerry Hirano, who  seems to have more than justice on his mind.

 

Death Nosh 

In the sleepy town of Bayshore, Wisconsin, senior citizens are dying at an alarming rate. It’s up to food blogger Nell Bailey to convince the police that there’s more afoot than natural causes. In the third installment of the Noshes Up North Culinary series, heroine Nell draws on the grit of northern women as she strives to hold her own among men who think they know better.

Romance

Women of Today Anthology 

This collection of six novels by female authors follow strong female characters who face diversity and must look within to find their own strength to overcome their challenges, and possibly find romance along the way. This one ebook will keep you satisfied for hours on end.

Memoir

Shaking the Family Tree Shaking the Family Tree by Dallas H

With unflinching honesty and enduring warmth, anonymous author Dallas H. traces her journey out of hell and towards recovery. After learning that alcoholism has affected her family for generations, she strives to flip the genetic script and break the cycle of addiction. This memoir is for anyone hoping that their summer can bring renewal for them or their family.

Lumberjack Jesus 

In a series of essays written in memoir form expounding from his life, Bruce Kirkpatrick shows us as he discovers a loving God who is a good conversationalist, and often looks like a lumberjack. God comes alive in these pages in everyday life—in stories about Vietnam heroes, cowboy movies, wrestling matches and chemistry sets. Whether or not you consider yourself Christian, this is a sweet and encouraging read for anyone looking for a path through life.

 

 

Brittiany Koren 1

Death Nosh by Mary Grace Murphy

Cozy Culinary Mystery

Hardcover ISBN: #9780998167305 – $23.99
Paperback ISBN: #9780998167312 – $15.99
Ebook ISBN: #9780998167329 – $8.99

A Noshes Up North Culinary Mystery

Someone is sneaking into houses, committing murders, and escaping without a trace. How can Nell convince the police chief to take her theory seriously?

People are dying in the pleasant community of Bayshore, Wisconsin. The police think it’s the normal passing of senior citizens. But Nell Bailey, food blogger and restaurant reviewer, has a different opinion.

Surrounded by mouthwatering meals, Nell struggles with her weight as she visits restaurants, and blogs about their delectable dishes. She strives to conquer her stress-eating as the death count rises.

To further complicate her life, Sam, her gentleman friend, isn’t acting very gentlemanly. His plans for the two of them don’t include Nell investigating any more murders. Can she hold her own against two men, Sam Ryan and Chief Vance, who are so accustomed to doing things their way?

 

 

Mary Grace Murphy mystery author

Author Bio: Mary Grace Murphy’s penchant for reading has been a delight, both personally and professionally. She not only devoured books on her own, but encouraged her students to find their own joy of reading during her thirty-four years as a middle school teacher. Another thread running through Mary Grace’s life has been her quest for intriguing eating establishments and interesting recipes. Solving mysteries and discovering scrumptious food set Mary Grace on the path to create her culinary mystery series, Noshes Up North.

Mary Grace resides in Oconto, Wisconsin, a community not unlike her fictional town of Bayshore, where she appreciates the varied food and events which symbolize Northeast Wisconsin.

Brittiany Koren 1

Writer’s Wednesday: An Interview with the Edgar and Stoker Nominated Author, Billie Sue Mosiman

I first discovered Billie Sue and her writing in the mid 90s about a year before she edited the anthology, Never Shake a Family Tree. It is with great pleasure to have her as our guest today. Please help me welcome her to The Editing Essentials!

Billie Sue Mosiman is an Edgar and Stoker Nominated author of  more than 50 e-books. She published 13 novels with New York major publishers and recently published BANISHED, her latest novel. She’s the author of at least 150 published short stories that were in various magazines and anthologies. Her latest stories will be in BETTER WEIRD edited by Paul F. Olson from Cemetery Dance, a tribute anthology to David Silva, a story in the anthology ALLEGORIES OF THE TAROT edited by Annetta Ribken, and another story in William Cook’s FRESH FEAR. She’s an active member of HWA and International Thriller Writers. She’s working on a new novel of suspense titled THE GREY MATTER. You can visit her at: The Peculiar Life of a Writer http://www.peculiarwriter.blogspot.com, or at Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/billie.s.mosiman or on Twitter: @billiemosiman or at Billie Sue’s Amazon Page.

WD: Does your family support your writing career, and if so, have they always?

BM: Yes, my husband has always supported me in my career. Before I sold a novel, all my other women friends had a job and I was at home, writing. I’m sure they thought I was being lazy because didn’t everyone work? My husband continued supporting the family and believing in me until I got my first contract. My daughters were raised with a writer so they understood what I was doing (I probably lectured them enough about how important Mama’s work was!). They tried hard not to interrupt me when I was at the typewriter and the computer.

WD: Does anybody in your family write because of your influence on them?

BM: No. My daughters are creative in various ways, but they haven’t been writing.

WD: What inspired you to begin writing?

BM: I can’t imagine. Since I wanted to be a writer from the time I was thirteen, I can’t say what inspired me. I think it was because I was raised around Southern storytellers who sat around telling one another tales, but it could also be because, or in addition to, my love of reading books.

WD: What author or authors influenced your own style?

 

BM: There were several. John D. MacDonald, Jim Thompson, Phillip K. Dick, Scott Fitzgerald, John Steinbeck, and a whole raft of mystery and suspense popular writers during the 70s and 80s.

WD: What is your own process for getting a manuscript complete? Any habits? How do you stay focused?

BM: I believe in dedication and discipline. I was under contract from year to year so I had novels to turn in and expected of me. I would write every day five days a week and take weekends off to devote to my family. That kind of schedule became a routine. I stay focused by reading over what I’ve written the day before and falling into the page, falling into the story so that I can see it in my head and can write the next scene or chapter.

WD: What are your thoughts on how the industry is radically changing to benefit the author? How do you see the industry changing for the better or worse?

BM: With digital books it’s changed almost completely. Writers in my early years of course sent their paper manuscripts in manuscript boxes to New York publishing houses or agents. Today writers can simply upload them to a digital online bookstore. I think the industry has changed for the better in giving the author more control and it’s changed for the worse in making people believe their work is ready to be “published” digitally when it isn’t, or when as writers they really have some way to go to be professional writers. I expect it will all shake out eventually, but the transition might be rocky.

WD: If you could give one tip to a new writer, what would it be?

BM: Write like it means something to you, like storytelling is your life’s goal and you want to tell the best stories anyone ever told. Try to write in a humane way, with heart, and hope to touch people. Write with nerve, take risks, try to do what hasn’t been done or do what has been done better. Lastly, get an editor. Your prose probably isn’t as polished as you think it is.

 

Thank you, Billie Sue, for being with us today! If you’d like to leave a comment or question for Billie Sue, we will be happy to pass it on to her.