Marketing Your Books To A Larger Audience

How are you marketing your books? What are you doing to grow your audience? Here’s a few tips that might get you thinking in a new direction! Good luck!

1)      Networking Your Sales Team: Every writer has a sales team. Figuring out who your best sales people are is the trick. Here’s some examples of where you might find them.

  1. Social Media friends and acquaintances
  2. Personal Family, Friends, & Co-workers
  3. Writers Organizations and Critique Groups

2)      Posting on Social Media Sites: What are you posting on Social Media sites? Buy my book? Or, this is who I am and these are my books? These examples help to market you and your books.

  1. New releases coming soon
  2. Summary of individual books
  3. Talk about links on your website
  4. Share an author bio
  5. Pictures of what you find interesting
  6. Book Covers
  7. Info on Appearances/Conferences.
  8. Character interview
  9. Tips on writing
  10. Guest writers or other professionals on your blog
  11. Links to where your books can be purchased

3)      Promoting Yourself at Community Events: Meet new people and talk about what it’s like to be a writer. Pair up with other local authors to cross-promote one another.

  1. Talk with independent book store owners & librarians (ask them to add you to their event newsletter, if they have one and willing to)
  2. Readings/book signings
  3. Presentation for the local writer’s group or book club
  4. Donate books to the book store/library
  5. Presentations/Readings at University & High School libraries or in the classroom
  6. Presentations/Readings at Senior Citizen Centers/Wellness Centers/Community Events/Church Events

4)      Use Promotional Materials that have your book title, book series, or your author name on them: Why? Because people will remember you if they’re holding something with your book title or name on it. It’s also a great way to get new readers unintentionally. Think–useful items.

  1. Book marks
  2. Bumper stickers
  3. Magnets
  4. Tote bags
  5. T-shirts
  6. Pens
  7. Coffee Mugs

5)        Mailings: Again, be creative in how you contact your fan base. If you’re sending out an e-newsletter, have tips other people would like to learn or fun facts about your books or characters.

  1. Newsletters and E-Newsletters
  2. Postcards
  3. Fan letters
  4. Mass E-mails

6) Traditional Media Marketing: Use an old idea and make it new–by promoting who you are and your book(s) locally and nationally.

  1. Interviews on: radio, television, newspaper and blogs
  2. Commercials/Ads on radio, television, newspaper, streaming radio, and billboards
  3. Live Broadcasts at an event

Of course this isn’t a complete list, but it’s a good start. Don’t be afraid to step out of the box when thinking of how to market your books. There are readers just waiting to discover your stories!

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E. Tip of the Week: Writing Challenge

I’m teaching a session of writing classes to a group of local writers. Some of the participants have been writing for years, and others are just beginning to take the craft seriously. My challenge to them last week was to double their word count from what they wrote two weeks ago.

Some writers wrote less than 1000 words two weeks ago, some wrote more. One woman wrote 4000 words in less than two weeks, so her challenge is to double it and write more than 8000 words by next Thursday.

Writing challenges can be a great way to get out the excess words that are built inside of us just waiting to come out. Usually not all the words will be used in a final product, but the adrenalin rush from writing so many words in such a short time span can be exhilarating!

My own personal challenge is to write 1000 words a week, or 1000 words on Sunday, my day off from editing. Some days I can write the 1000 words in 30 minutes or so, other days I have to really work at it. But whatever the challenge is, it’s a great feeling to reach my desired goal.

What are some of your own personal writing goals? Are you making them? Is it time to double up your word count and challenge yourself?

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When Dreams Come True Anthology Edited by Brittiany Koren and Lara Hunter

We’re so excited to share that the first Written Dreams anthology, When Dreams Come True edited by Brittiany Koren and Lara Hunter is available for purchase. We hope you enjoy it! Lara and I had a blast putting it together. :)

Here’s the links to the book on the various platforms:

When Dreams Come True at Smashwords

When Dreams Come True at Amazon

When Dreams Come True at Barnes & Noble

Cover Art © 2013 by Written Dreams

 

We asked the authors to write a romantic fantasy short story about the trials and tribulations we endure in order to make our dreams come true. Included are ten romantic fantasy stories written by Esther M. Friesner, Abby Goldsmith, Christen Anne Kelly, John Marco, Victoria Murray, Mickey Zucker Reichert, Laura Resnick, Kristine Kathryn Rusch, Randy Tatano, and Tricia Zoeller with a special poem from Lessie DeGroot.

A special thanks goes to Kim Wickman, our wonderful Cover Artist, for the amazing cover art, and to all the authors for giving us such great stories to include. Thank you all so very much!

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Writer’s Wednesday: An Interview with the Edgar and Stoker Nominated Author, Billie Sue Mosiman

I first discovered Billie Sue and her writing in the mid 90s about a year before she edited the anthology, Never Shake a Family Tree. It is with great pleasure to have her as our guest today. Please help me welcome her to The Editing Essentials!

Billie Sue Mosiman is an Edgar and Stoker Nominated author of  more than 50 e-books. She published 13 novels with New York major publishers and recently published BANISHED, her latest novel. She’s the author of at least 150 published short stories that were in various magazines and anthologies. Her latest stories will be in BETTER WEIRD edited by Paul F. Olson from Cemetery Dance, a tribute anthology to David Silva, a story in the anthology ALLEGORIES OF THE TAROT edited by Annetta Ribken, and another story in William Cook’s FRESH FEAR. She’s an active member of HWA and International Thriller Writers. She’s working on a new novel of suspense titled THE GREY MATTER. You can visit her at: The Peculiar Life of a Writer http://www.peculiarwriter.blogspot.com, or at Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/billie.s.mosiman or on Twitter: @billiemosiman or at Billie Sue’s Amazon Page.

WD: Does your family support your writing career, and if so, have they always?

BM: Yes, my husband has always supported me in my career. Before I sold a novel, all my other women friends had a job and I was at home, writing. I’m sure they thought I was being lazy because didn’t everyone work? My husband continued supporting the family and believing in me until I got my first contract. My daughters were raised with a writer so they understood what I was doing (I probably lectured them enough about how important Mama’s work was!). They tried hard not to interrupt me when I was at the typewriter and the computer.

WD: Does anybody in your family write because of your influence on them?

BM: No. My daughters are creative in various ways, but they haven’t been writing.

WD: What inspired you to begin writing?

BM: I can’t imagine. Since I wanted to be a writer from the time I was thirteen, I can’t say what inspired me. I think it was because I was raised around Southern storytellers who sat around telling one another tales, but it could also be because, or in addition to, my love of reading books.

WD: What author or authors influenced your own style?

 

BM: There were several. John D. MacDonald, Jim Thompson, Phillip K. Dick, Scott Fitzgerald, John Steinbeck, and a whole raft of mystery and suspense popular writers during the 70s and 80s.

WD: What is your own process for getting a manuscript complete? Any habits? How do you stay focused?

BM: I believe in dedication and discipline. I was under contract from year to year so I had novels to turn in and expected of me. I would write every day five days a week and take weekends off to devote to my family. That kind of schedule became a routine. I stay focused by reading over what I’ve written the day before and falling into the page, falling into the story so that I can see it in my head and can write the next scene or chapter.

WD: What are your thoughts on how the industry is radically changing to benefit the author? How do you see the industry changing for the better or worse?

BM: With digital books it’s changed almost completely. Writers in my early years of course sent their paper manuscripts in manuscript boxes to New York publishing houses or agents. Today writers can simply upload them to a digital online bookstore. I think the industry has changed for the better in giving the author more control and it’s changed for the worse in making people believe their work is ready to be “published” digitally when it isn’t, or when as writers they really have some way to go to be professional writers. I expect it will all shake out eventually, but the transition might be rocky.

WD: If you could give one tip to a new writer, what would it be?

BM: Write like it means something to you, like storytelling is your life’s goal and you want to tell the best stories anyone ever told. Try to write in a humane way, with heart, and hope to touch people. Write with nerve, take risks, try to do what hasn’t been done or do what has been done better. Lastly, get an editor. Your prose probably isn’t as polished as you think it is.

 

Thank you, Billie Sue, for being with us today! If you’d like to leave a comment or question for Billie Sue, we will be happy to pass it on to her.

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E. Tip of the Week: Character Count

Characters are the life of every story so it’s important to treat them with respect and pay close attention to the details. However, it’s easy to get carried away and forget about  some of the “don’ts” that come along with character building.

  • If your reader needs to keep a notebook by their bedside every time a new character is introduced in your book, you’ve got too many characters.
  • If you are having trouble keeping your characters straight in your own head, it’s time to limit the number of characters in the story.
  • If your characters are screaming to have their own story, and not be a supporting role, it might be time to start an outline on a new story.
  • If you have multiple characters whose names all start with the same letter like “s” or “m” consider changing two of the characters names to start with a different letter so the reader can keep the characters straight in their head. Or, decide if you really need those other characters.
  • If you have a character just so the main character isn’t talking to themselves out loud, is that “friend” really necessary.

There are many more character “do’s” and “don’ts” but these are just a few I thought worth mentioning now. What are some of the “do’s” and “don’ts” you’ve learned over the years?

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Writer’s Wednesday: An Interview with Tricia Zoeller, Author of First Born

Today, we’re excited to have Tricia Zoeller as our guestblogger. I first met Tricia through another author we worked with, M.E. May. and we became fast friends. Tricia is a very talented writer and I’m looking forward to seeing many, many novels written by her. Please welcome Tricia to The Editing Essentials.

Tricia Zoeller lives in Marietta, Georgia with her husband, Lou, her little yappy dog, Lola Belle, and her big orange mutant cat, George. Her two stepsons, Joseph and Robert, make stopovers as well, making sure to keep life an adventure. Writing has always been a part of her life—like breathing and chocolate. Tricia loves to hear from her readers. You can catch up with her here:  http://www.triciazoeller.com/ , https://www.facebook.com/pages/Tricia-Zoeller-Author/439025286173082?ref=hl  , http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/17670526-first-born

WD: What inspired you to begin writing?

TZ: I’ve always written. I’ve always been a reader. My father worked for his school paper and influenced me as I was growing up to take an interest in writing. He traveled frequently for his job and would read a mystery (quite often Agatha Christie) on his overseas flights and give the book to me when he returned.

In high school, I wrote for the school paper and in college, I pursued a degree in journalism from Indiana University in Bloomington. However, after graduation I never worked as a writer. Instead, I obtained my masters degree and worked as a Speech-Language Pathologist for over a decade.  I liked that it combined my love of language, science, and helping people. I never stopped writing poems, novellas, etc. When health problems caused me to stop working as a therapist, I turned to writing as an outlet.

WD: Does your family support your writing?

TZ: My husband has a love/hate relationship with my writing. Sometimes, I get a bit obsessed or distracted. Also, I’m a thinker; he’s a doer. If he had his way, I would have published this book over a year ago. He also is not a fiction reader. So when I talk about shapeshifters or vampires or changelings, he will sometimes get a confused look on his face. But he never asked questions when I took over the one spare bedroom and made it into my writing studio complete with fantasy art for inspiration. I’ve also overheard him talking about my characters to people and realized that he really has been listening.

WD: Which authors do you enjoy reading?

TZ: I have focused on fantasy and paranormal over the last several years. One of my favorite books is Stephen King’s collection of shorts, Just After Sunset. I also enjoy reading Nalini Singh, J. K. Rowling, Robin Hobb, Jana Oliver, Kim Harrison, Charlaine Harris, Suzanne Johnson, and Anya Bast.

WD: How did Lily come to be? Is she based off of personal situations?

TZ: Lily came to me in her shapeshifter form after I read Charlaine Harris’ Sookie Stackhouse series. I had an idea of creating a different kind of shifter. Even though I took a humorous approach to my character’s shape, there is a serious story behind it. Lily’s struggles with her shapeshifting directly relate to my struggles with Lupus. May is Lupus Awareness Month and it is almost exactly fifteen years to this day that I started cytoxan treatments for kidney disease.

I had read so many books where “bam” a character goes through a transformation, they suddenly can do anything, and they own it. I tried to take a more realistic approach to how it really feels to have your body out of control and the ups and downs of each day something new happening just when you feel like you’ve mastered the situation.

WD: Was there a specific person or event that inspired you to create Lily?

TZ: I may have based Lily after my friend Cheryl’s creature (no spoilers). Lily’s heritage stems from my experiences with eastern medicine. I did Korean yoga, sought Chinese healing sessions, acupuncture, etc. This influenced not only the creation of Lily, but another character in my book.

WD: Atlanta is your setting for the Lily Moore series. What made you decide on that backdrop?

TZ: I’ve lived in Atlanta off and on for over fifteen years. I know Atlanta and I love its greenery. It suits a shifter. You can drive 15 miles in any direction in Atlanta and find a wildlife management area, mountain, lake or river. In fact, the Chattahoochee River plays a big part in book 2.

WD: During the writing process, what is the toughest part for you to write—beginning, middle, or end or characters, setting, plot, action scenes and why?

TZ: The middle is definitely the hardest for me. I always know my beginning, end and the title. I also know my main character immediately. I have an idea of the middle, but organizing it can give me fits. First Born was the hardest because I insisted on having all these characters with plots and subplots. I actually used a flipchart, timeline and crime board at one point to hash out the details.

WD: Is there anything or anyone that specifically helped you during those more trying times in the writing process?

It takes a village. I attended many of the Georgia Writers Association workshops and took online writing courses through the Romance Writers of America Mystery/Suspense Chapter called Coffin, Kiss of Death. These got me back in the right mindset. I also visited crime scene writing forums via yahoo groups.

My friends and fellow writers provided me with a great network. Written Dreams helped me with the editing process—a painful but necessary step. My critique partners and beta readers have listened time and time again and prodded me along in this very rough last stretch.

To beginning authors, I say keep your eyes and ears open. Don’t give up! Listen to constructive criticism, but act only on those snippets that ring true for you. Know you will make mistakes, but learn from them and move on. Carve out a routine for yourself and write every day.

Thank you Tricia for being our guest today! If you’d like to leave a comment or question for Tricia, we’ll be sure to pass it on to her. Thank you!

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Thoughts on Writing from Best-selling Author, John Marco

Today, we’re very excited to have John Marco as our guestblogger. I first worked with John when he wrote a story, “The Hundredth Kill” for one of my anthologies I edited with Marty Greenberg. I was so touched by that story, I had to read his novels. His stories are so filled with emotion, depth and character, for me, it’s a joy to read his stories every time. Please help us welcome John to The Editing Essentials!

John Marco is the author of eightbooks, including the bestselling Tyrants and Kings trilogy and the books of the Bronze Knight, Lukien.  His latest novel, THE FOREVER KNIGHT, has just been published by DAW Books and is a Barnes and Noble and Kirkus top pick for April.  To find out more about John and his work, please visit his website at www.johnmarco.com.

WD: What inspired you to begin writing? A certain book, teacher, family member?
JM: I’m one of those people who think that writers are born rather than made, which might be why it’s difficult for me to pinpoint a particular instant of inspiration.  Writers often say that they’ve “always” wanted to be a writer, but for me it’s actually true.  I can’t remember a time when I didn’t want to be one.  There wasn’t a particular person that I met or book that I read.  It was just something that I found absolutely fascinating from the beginning—the ability to create stories and put them down on paper.  Of course none of us come out fully formed as writers.  There’s always more to learn and the striving to get better.  But for me, the desire was always there.  When I stop to think about it, that seems rather strange, as if I literally was born with it, but I bet all the writers out there will understand what I mean.
WD: Why did you choose to write in the fantasy genre instead of another genre? Or, did the genre choose you?
JM: In this case, I think the genre chose me.  There was never any question in my mind that I’d write fantasy.  Fantasy and science fiction were what inspired me as a kid.  I loved the old paperbacks and magazines—just seeing the artwork on their covers made me long to create those kinds of stories myself.  I still get wistful when I see one of those old, yellowing paperbacks, or when I hear someone mention Omni magazine.  And fantasy in particular is such a big pallet!  It’s limitless.
WD: What is your favorite thing to write? Writing dialogue, action scenes, character background, etc.?
JM: I had to think on this for a moment, because I do enjoy working on character backgrounds, and although writing action scenes is difficult I enjoy them, too.  But I’d have to say dialogue.  I’ve always struggled with dialogue, and it’s something I’m constantly working on improving because I absolutely love great dialogue.  I know it when I see it, or maybe I should say when I hear it, because it has a meter to it that draws the reader in and carries them along.  When it’s really well done it’s revealing in ways that makes normal exposition dull.
WD: How much of your own life experiences get into your stories?
JM: I’m not sure.  Really, I’m not trying to dodge the question.  I honestly don’t know.  People used to think I had military experience because some of my books were called “military fantasy,” but I’ve never been in the service and have only fired a gun once in my life.  I’ve never been in war or been overseas to see great ancient architecture or even ridden a horse, yet all these things figure heavily into my writing.  I’ve lived a really provincial life, because that’s how I like it.  On the other hand, I pile a lot of emotional stuff into my stories, and that’s got to come from somewhere.  None of it is autobiographical, but they’re all subjects that I care about or move me on some level.  I’ve always been more interested in why people do the things they do more than in what they actually did.
WD: Does your family support your writing career, and if so, have they always?
JM: My family has always supported my writing career.  I have a wonderful wife that lets me hide out at my desk for hours at a time, a young son that proudly tells his friends that his dad’s a writer, and other family members who are always out there spreading the word and trying to get people to try my books.  It’s hard for me to imagine being a writer without that kind of support.  I love writing, but it’s a ton of work and I can get pretty moody when I’m deep into a project.
WD: Tell us about your new release. What was the process with The Forever Knight? How long did it take to write? What types of things happened in your real life during the process of writing it that may have slowed it down?
JM: First, I’d like to say that The Forever Knight is kind of a soft “reboot” of a previous trilogy that I wrote that started with The Eyes of God over ten years ago.  A number of people have asked me if they can start by reading this new book, or if they first have to go back and read the three others; I always say that they can just jump right in to this new book because it is very different from the ones before it.  It’s much shorter, for one thing. It concentrates on a single character, and it’s much less epic in scope.  All those things were by design.  It’s really a more intimate tale about a knight who is haunted by his own immortality and how he tries to come to terms with it.  In fact, I often refer to it as “a bloody tale of revenge and immortality.”  To me, that sums up the theme of the book nicely.
Writing the book actually didn’t take me very long once I made up my mind to focus on it.  I had the outline done and started writing it, and then wound up taking a break from it while I took a job outside of writing.  When I got back to it, I knew I had to really make the time to write, something I wasn’t used to doing after having the luxury of writing full-time for so long.  I used to have a tiny place in upstate NY, and I remember going up there and working on it.  That was fantastic, the kind of thing I used to picture being a writer was like.  No distractions, nothing but my computer and microwave dinners.  Once I made up my mind to get it done, it really flowed.
WD: How do you deal with writer’s block? Are there places you go—in your mind, or in real life—that help you get back on track with the scene you are writing?
JM: Writer’s block?  No way.  No time for that.  I’m sorry to sound flippant, but I could give myself a thousand excuses for not getting my work done.  That’s what writer’s block sounds like to me—just another in a long list of excuses.  Writer’s block is really a problem of having nothing to say.  And if that’s the case, it means I haven’t done my work in scoping out the story.  Having an idea isn’t enough—you need a story.  So I take my time and outline, and determine what I want to say ahead of time, and then I get to it.  If I reach a difficult section (which I do often), I force myself to power through it.  Maybe I’ll go for a long drive and talk to myself and let it play out in my mind, but I don’t let it fester.  I try to look at it like a job.  Yes, it’s art, but you also have to get the damn thing done.
WD: What do you enjoy about the writing process? What do you dislike?
JM: I need to pull a Sarah Palin on you and answer this question in my own way, if you don’t mind.  There was a period of about two years where I wasn’t writing at all, because I went back to work at a job that I hated, and I wasn’t sure where things were going with my books.  Candidly, it was a difficult time for me.  Eventually a good friend coaxed me back into writing, and since then I’ve seen the whole thing through new eyes.  I not only realized how much I missed writing, but how much I love it.  Yes, it’s a cruel mistress and all that, but I’ve honestly come to appreciate all of it in a deeper way.  If I had to identify the part of it that I don’t enjoy, I’d have to say the publishing process itself.  It’s long and fraught.  But when it comes to actually writing, I’m much more willing to embrace its challenges now.  I’m learning to love the hard parts.
WD: If you could write any of your stories over again, which would it be?
JM: Oh, I’m so glad you asked me this question, because I’ve never had the chance to say this in public, but I would really like the chance to rework my first book, The Jackal of Nar.  I recently heard an interview with Frank Langella in which he said that he almost never watches any of his older movies, because he always sees things he could have done better in them.  That’s how I feel about Jackal.  Now, I should say that a lot of people have told me that that’s their favorite book of mine. I’m grateful to hear that, but I know I’ve gotten better as a writer and there’s things I wish I could go back and change.  But I guess that’s just the nature of the business.
WD: Which non-fiction books on the craft of writing have helped you become a better writer?
JM: I’ve read a lot of these kinds of books over the years, and I’ve found useful stuff in all of them, but the only one that sticks in my mind is a book called Writing and Selling Science Fiction that came out in 1976.  I took that book out of the library when I was ten or twelve years old, and I never gave it back!  I know, shame on me.  Really, it’s silly that I kept it, but I loved it.  I read it over and over again and I still keep it with me when I write.  Each chapter of it is written by a different author and covers a different subject, like creating characters, writing dialogue, and so on.  Even though it’s old, it’s full of good, timeless advice.  Maybe copies of it can be found on Ebay.  It’s worth seeking out.

Thanks so much, John, for being here and sharing your tips on writing. We wish you the best with the release of The Forever Knight. If you’d like to post a question or comment for John, we’ll be sure to pass it on. Thank you!

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Written Dreams’ First Annual Writer’s Retreat: July 28th-30th, 2013

Written Dreams’ Writer’s Retreat

The first annual Written Dreams’ Writer’s Retreat will be held at the beautiful Miscauno Island Four Seasons Resort in Pembine, Wisconsin on July 28th through July 30th, 2013.

The fee for the Retreat is $159.00 per author. Reservations are required, and can be made by contacting us by email at admin@writtendreams.com. The deadline to register is June 25th, 2013. The Retreat fee includes all Seminars, admission to the Socials/Book Signing Event, Snacks during the Seminars, and the luncheon on Monday.

When registering, please give your name and contact information. We will also need you to make your luncheon selection. Choices are: California Chicken Sandwich, Hero Club Sandwich, or Blackened Salmon Caesar Salad.

We encourage attendees to stay at the hotel. Most rooms have kitchenettes and are wonderful accommodations. Room rates start at $119., and are not included in the Retreat fee. Room reservations for the hotel can be made by calling (877)-324-5244, or online at http://www.thefourseasonswi.com/. A buffet-style continental breakfast served daily is included with the cost of the room.

The itinerary for the conference is as follows:

Sunday, July 28th

Arrive at Four Seasons Resort and check in at the Written Dreams’ table set up in the Main Lobby. Check in for the hotel is any time after 3 P.M.

6:00 P.M.: Social Hour. Come meet your fellow attendees in a relaxed atmosphere.

Monday, July 29th

Continental Breakfast is served starting at 7 A.M. until 9 A.M. next to the Lobby by the Front Desk.

9 A.M.: Welcome and Who We Are

By Brittiany Koren & Lara Hunter

 9:45 A.M.: Free Marketing, What It Is, and How To Get It

 Presented by Barb VanDeHei

 10:30 A.M. Break/Snacks

 10:45 A.M.: How to Design A Website to Increase Your Visibility to Readers

 Presented by Bill Koehne

 11:30 A.M.: Social Media for the Not So Social Author

 Presented by Lara Hunter & Bill Koehne

 Noon: Luncheon will be provided in the conference room.

 1:00 P.M.: The Joy of Independence: 7 Minutes to a Full-time Writing Business

 Presented by Virginia McCullough

 2:00 P.M.: How to Make Your Story and Characters Come Alive in the Minds of Readers

 Presented by Brittiany Koren

 2:45 P.M.: Concluding Remarks for the Day

             By Lara Hunter

 3:00 P.M. Free Time, Writing Time

 The Written Dreams’ staff will be available for questions/discussion.

 6:00 P.M.: Book Signing & Social Hour. 

             Please feel free to bring your books to sell and sign for other attendees/guests.

Tuesday, July 30th

Continental Breakfast is served starting at 7 A.M. until 9 A.M. next to the Lobby by the Front Desk.

9:00 A.M.: The Ins and Outs of E-book Publishing: What An Author Needs to Know

Presented by Lara Hunter & Kim Wickman

 9:45 A.M.: Utilizing the Under-utilized Senses, and How to Get It Down on Paper

 Presented by Barbara Raffin

 10:45 am :Break/Snacks

 11:00 A.M.: Missing Your Motivation to Write?  Here’s How to Get It Back

 Presented by Brittiany Koren

 11:45-Noon: Concluding Remarks by Brittiany Koren & Lara Hunter

                                We’re looking forward to seeing you there! :)

 

Photo Courtesy of Four Seasons Resort in Miscauno Island
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